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Kilmallock Collegiate Church Church
 

County

Limerick

Coordinates

N 52° 24' 03.18"   W 008° 34' 28.56"

Nearest town

Kilmallock

Grid Ref.

R 60899 27861

Map No.

73

Elevation a.s.l. (m)

94

Date of visit

Friday 19 June 2015

GPS Accuracy (m)

4
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The church as it appears from the south-southwest.


At last, I would say. After several visits to Kilmallock and all its monuments, at last we decided to visit this Collegiate Church!
It's about 150 metres south of the Dominican Priory, with River Loobagh between them.
It was built in the 13th century and dedicated to Saints Peter and Paul.
It was a collegiate church in that it was served by a college, a community of clerics which didn't follow a monastic rule. One of the priests was responsible for both the religious and business matters.
The church, which is aligned to the east (95°), has a long chancel with a fine five-light window and three two-light windows in the south wall.
The nave has two aisles, the arcades are still intact.
There's a huge south transept which is the only section of the building that has a roof. Unfortunately it's closed by gates, so that it's impossible to have a closer look at the wonderful altar tombs inside.
Among them there's the magnificent altar tomb of John Verdon and his wife Alsone Haly, erected by her second husband Walter Coppinger, which carries elaborated decorations. We could see the two effigies with three coats of arms, two angels and a long Latin inscription carved all around the edges of the slab and around the effigies. Another tomb richly decorated tomb is of George Verdon. This carries the coat of arms and a lengthy Latin inscription and the motto "Non fugiam! Prius Experiar. Non mors mihi terror" which means "I won't flee! I'll attempt first. Death don't scares me".
Against the east wall of the transept is another fine altar tomb, the FitzGerald Tomb, with a skeleton representing Death and a Latin inscription that, in many ways, reminds the visitor of the shortness of life.
There's a doorway in the south wall and another one in the west wall. Above this one there's a three-light window and in the northwest corner there's a circular tower, remodelled over the remnants of a previous round tower from the 10th or 11th century.
This is what remains of the early monastery founded here in the 7th century by St. Mocheallóg. The town takes its name from this monastery.


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