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Dromoughy Stone Circle
 

County

Cork

Coordinates

N 51° 49' 59.0"   W 009° 37' 25.9"

Nearest town

Kenmare

Grid Ref.

V 88111 65722

Map No.

85

Elevation a.s.l. (m)

92

Date of visit

Monday 24 June 2013

GPS Accuracy (m)

3
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The complete circle with the boulder in the centre seen from the north.


Sometimes this place is also known as Dromroe Stone Circle, but the right name is Dromoughy, like the signpost that once indicated the site said.
The alternative name I give to this site is "The GPS Stone Circle". On May 16th, 2002, we came to visit this site by pure chance. We were driving in the area, we saw the wooden signpost at the beginning of a path, we stopped and got out of the car, we followed the sign, then we followed the wooden posts of the "Beara Way" and in about 15 minutes we reached the stone circle, but when we arrived at the stones the weather changed and a thick fog came down on us, we didn't see the wooden posts anymore, we wandered among trees and grass, and we got lost... It took a lot of time, many prayers and the welcome help of an elderly woman who miraculously appeared before us to find the way back to our car. This dreadful experience had me think of getting a GPS receiver to avoid further nightmares.
The Dromoughy stone circle was the trigger for this website.
This time we had trouble reaching it. Much has changed around here since our first visit, but we arrived at the circle anyway. We had our OS map, we had our GPS receiver, it was only a matter of finding the right route among barbed wires, streams to wade, ditches to jump over, muddy puddles to avoid, sheep, cows and a bull to greet and other obstacles in the way.
Unfortunately this huge effort wasn't rewarded properly, the stone circle was mostly hidden in the high rushes and the result was a messy place.
The circle has 15 stones over a diameter of about 9 metres.
In the centre of the circle is a boulder burial. The tallest stone is at the east-northeast (80°). The two stones at the southeast (120° and 150°) and the one at the south-southwest (200°) have fallen.
We feel proud of our success in finding this place, but we don't think we'd advice anybody to come up here.
This is definitely one of the hardest places to find and one of the best ways to get lost.


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