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Duiske High Cross
 

County

Kilkenny

Coordinates

N 52° 32' 27.1"   W 006° 57' 15.6"

Nearest town

Graiguenamanagh

Grid Ref.

S 70996 43748

Map No.

68

Elevation a.s.l. (m)

18

Date of visit

Friday 28 May 2010

GPS Accuracy (m)

7
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The Akylthawn cross seen from the northwest.


When we first visited the church, on June 2nd, 2001, we didn't have a proper look at the high crosses.
The two crosses are in the southeast part of the churchyard.
The first one of the two is a rather squat cross, with a short shaft, maybe originally it was longer and might have broken in the past. It's 1.68 metres tall, 45 centimetres wide, 18 centimetres thick and its arms are 85 centimetres wide, with a solid wheel. It stands on a concrete base of 95 centimetres by 1.20 metres on its sides and 95 centimetres tall. This cross has the name of Akylthawn. It has a crucifixion scene on its east face, with a Christ dressed in a robe down to his knees.
The second cross, also known with the name of Ballyogan, is 1.50 metres northeast from the first one and it looks a little more modern and is in better overall conditions. It measure 1.45 metres of height, 32 centimetres of width and 22 centimetrs of thickness. The arms are 56 centimetres wide, with a solid wheel. On the east face of this cross there's a crucifixion and there are the scene of Adam and Eve and of the sacrifice of Isaac. A third panel is half hidden into the concrete base, wich measures 95 centimetres by 105 centimetres and is 100 centimetres tall.
It seems that both crosses were taken here from two different places in the 13th century, but they date back from the 9th century.
The coordinates in this page are taken at the first cross.
The abbey, originally built in 1204, has a modern look but it is worth a visit to read the history of the church and to see the wonderful stained glasses on the windows. In one of the rooms of the church there's a fine effigy of a Norman knight and it seems it's one of the finest medieval effigies in all Ireland.


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