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Annaghdown - Nunnery Church
 

County

Galway

Coordinates

N 53° 23' 17.23"   W 009° 04' 19.18"

Nearest town

Castlequarter

Grid Ref.

M 28690 38085

Map No.

45

Elevation a.s.l. (m)

14

Date of visit

Thursday 14 June 2018

GPS Accuracy (m)

3
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The ruins of the nunnery and the rectangular cairn from the northeast.


Annaghdown is a historic monastic settlement near the east shore of Lough Corrib. Its name comes from the Irish Eanach Dhúin that means "The marsh of the fort". In the area many road signs simply say Eanach Dhúin, and this might be a little misleading.
It is said that the monastery was founded by St. Brendan of Clonfert in the 6th century on a land that was granted to him by Áed mac Echach, King of Connacht. Brendan died here in Annaghdown in 577, but he was buried at Clonfert Cathedral.

The monastic site includes four important buildings. A church, a nunnery, a cathedral and a priory.

This small and scant building is known as the Nunnery, it might date to the 11th or 12th century, thus making it the oldest building of the monastery.
The only fraction of building still standing is the southwest corner. Two adjoining structures formed this building. Between the Nunnery and the St. John the Baptist's Abbey a rectangular cairn of loose stones from the buildings have been arranged.

The buildings are aligned to the east-northeast (75°).


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